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The Pledge of Allegiance

Francis Bellamy (1855-1931) wrote the original Pledge in August 1892. The Pledge was published in the September 8th issue of "The Youth's Companion", the leading family magazine and the Reader's Digest of its day. In 1892 Francis Bellamy was chairman of a committee of state superintendents of education in the National Education Association. As its chairman, he prepared the program for the public schools' quadric-centennial celebration for Columbus Day in 1892. He structured this public school program around a flag raising ceremony and a flag salute - his "Pledge of Allegiance".

His original Pledge read as follows: 'I pledge allegiance to my Flag and (to*) the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.' [ * 'to' added in October, 1892. ]

In 1923 and 1924 the National Flag Conference, under the leadership of the American Legion and the Daughters of the American Revolution, changed the Pledge's words "my flag", to "the Flag of the United States of America".

In 1954, Congress, after a campaign by the Knights of Columbus, added the words, "under God" to the Pledge.

If the Pledge's historical pattern repeats, its words will be modified during this decade. Below are two possible changes.

Some prolife advocates recite the following slightly revised Pledge: 'I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all, born and unborn.'

A few liberals recite a slightly revised version of Bellamy's original Pledge: 'I pledge allegiance to my Flag, and to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, indivisible, with equality, liberty and justice for all.'
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I pledge allegiance to my Flag
and the Republic for which it stands,
one nation, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.